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Posts Tagged ‘International Women’s Day’

UN International Women’s Day 2010

Posted by peacedevelopmentnetwork on March 15, 2010


UN International Women’s Day 2010

‘Celebrating the economic, political and social achievements

of women past, present and future’

43 Lancaster Gate, London, UK

Photo Link

A joint Universal Peace Federation and Women’s Federation for World Peace event to celebrate the UN’s International Women’s Day was held appropriately on the UK’s Mother’s Day.

Rita Payne, a former Editor of BBC Asia and currently the Chair of the Commonwealth Journalist’s Association – UK, reflected on the status of women in current developments and her own experience in the media in her speech, Women and Success – Is Hard Work Enough? ‘2010, on the face of it, is not a bad year for women’, she said, while pointing to Katherine Bigelow’s Oscar success on the eve of International Women’s Day and the passing of a Bill through the Indian Parliament to guarantee  that 1/3rd of all MPs are women. She added, ‘That there were protests and seven MPs were banned from the Indian Parliament shows that the battle for stronger representation for women is far from over.’

She referred to the raft of reviews and statistics that have emerged around Women’s Day revealing, for example, that there are more female Medical Doctor applicants than male because women have been outranking men in academic achievement.

However, she said some observers felt that former campaigning visionaries are being let down by the abuse of freedom by the laddette culture.

‘Maybe the greatest success will be when men and women are judged according to what they achieve than their gender’, she concluded. 

Her daughter suggested that, ‘Women can achieve many things but how can they do it without sacrificing the family.  Perhaps women can be more creative in addressing those needs but we won’t be able to do this without the men. We can address our needs with the help of men. Why don’t we forget about Women’s day and have a Family day instead?’

In a speech entitled ‘Women Initiating Change: The Strength of the Outsider’, Kat Callo explained the tragic cause of her work as a Trustee of Project Mosaic. Her cousin, a New York City firefighter, died in 9/11 trying to save those within the twin towers when the buildings collapsed. She began Project Mosaic, a UK-based educational charity that helps teach young people to be more tolerant of those coming from a different background – whether that’s a different race, ethnicity, religion, nationality or culture.

Violent extremism … plays on the theme of  “the outsider” – but it combines it with fear and ignorance, to creates a poisonous cocktail for our young people.

With a conversation, over a cup of tea or at a youth club or at a gathering of mothers at a refugee centre or talking with family members and friends. We are working to amplify the voice of the outsider – that person that takes a weakness and transforms it into a strength. (read more)

Hadia Saad had just returned from attending the 54th UN Congress on the Status of Women (CSW) in New York representing the Alulbayt Foundation in London. She also attended the UPF Parallel CSW event in New York. She shared about both experiences in a speech entitled, ‘Humanity Before Gender’. She said she was left with the sense that there is still a long way to go to obtain justice for women. She reflected on the position of women in Islam that tensions develop when the cultural traditions confine Islamic principles. (read more)

President of the League of Jewish Women

Mrs Ella Marks

Mrs. Ella Marks, the current President of the  League of Jewish Women (LJW), briefly described its history and activities since being founded in 1943. Stemming from a Judaic ethos, Jewish people believe that they should play an active part in the community wherever they live. The LJW has sought to educate young women to be both self supporting and train them to be active for the good of all society. The LJW is now affiliated to the National Council of Women as a consultative body. It is also very involved in interfaith meetings and activities. The LJW is a largely voluntary body that is an active community promoting service to those in need. She shared that she often reads to blind people.

Milena Ivovic commenting about the afternoon commented below, ‘It was very inspirational gathering. Women, outstanding achievers in various fields, were illustrating by their own life endeavours the greatness of human potential in each one of us. They are those who selflessly care for others in society and who know how to give from the essence. Their love and compassion certainly shed light and show the way.’

Shenaz Bunglawala

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Women and Success – Is Hard Work Enough? by Rita Payne

Posted by peacedevelopmentnetwork on March 14, 2010

Rita Payne


Women and Success – Is Hard Work Enough?

HIGHS

On the face of it 2010 hasn’t been bad for women so far. Kathryn Bigelow’s triumph at the Oscars, as the first woman ever to win the Best Film Award, couldn’t have been better timed, coming as it did on the eve of International Women’s Day.

Then on Tuesday (March 9) India passed an important milestone  – the  Upper House of Parliament approved a bill to reserve a third of all seats in the national parliament and state legislatures for women. The fact that there were noisy protests from opponents of the bill resulting in the suspension of 7 MPs indicates that the battle for stronger representation for women is far from over. The Bill, which was first proposed in 1996, still has to be passed by the Lower House of Parliament, though it looks as though it has enough support to win approval.

There is no doubt that women have come a long way in the last hundred years or so. According to the Independent, today in some highly paid professions such as medicine, there are more female entrants than male, because women are outranking men in academic performance. So, yes, there has been progress but how deep is this?

SOCIAL

In my years in the media I’ve had the opportunity to meet and work with many successful women and note the frustrations of others who’ve failed to make the progress they felt they deserved. The media is a particularly difficult field because it’s so highly competitive. It’s seen as glamorous and exciting and competition is fierce with men and women vying for relatively few jobs. Once you get in, it’s tough to move from one rung to the next. Besides, the work is so pressurised everyone has to give 110 per cent. Forget 9 to 5 cosy hours, there are a bewildering range of shifts and patterns with unsocial hours. Night shifts, 15 hour days, you can be on call at night on weekends, over Christmas, New Year and other public holidays.

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UN International Day of Women: Celebrating the Economic, Political and Social Achievements of Women Past, Present and Future.

Posted by peacedevelopmentnetwork on March 3, 2010

Women’s Federation for World Peace

&

Universal Peace Federation

43 Lancaster Gate, London W2 3NA

Direct Tel/Answer: 020 7262 0985

United Nations’ International Day of Women

‘Celebrating the economic, political and social achievements

of women past, present and future’

3:00 for 3:30 pm Sunday, March 14th

You are cordially invited to celebrate ‘International Women’s Day 2010’ which has the theme of: ‘the economic, political and social achievements of women past, present and future’ with the Women’s Federation for World Peace and the Universal Peace Federation, together with other organisations.

We would like to invite a number of the prominent women who have featured in our activities to consider the different perspective women bring to economic, political and social life. We would like to explore the examples of achievement where it has not been at the expense of femininity or family. This will take place on Sunday, March 14th from 3pm to 5pm in 43 Lancaster Gate, W2 3NA.  All men who appreciate the achievements of women are welcome!

Speakers include (for longer biographies read more):

Ms. Shenaz Bunglawala holds a Masters degree from the LSE, is a recipient of an LSE PhD studentship award and an award for Teaching Excellence from the Department of Government at LSE. Shenaz has lectured and taught undergraduate courses in political science, with a specific focus on religion, at the LSE, King’s College and has been guest lecturer at the American University at Richmond and St Andrews University. Her paper on ‘British Muslims: Identity and Engagement’ will be published in February 2009. Shenaz is Vice Chair of the Europe and International Affairs committee of the MCB. She is also a founder and executive committee member of the Conservative Friends of Turkey and co-editor of a new blog site for young British and European Muslim academics and writers to share critiques, perspectives and original research on Islam and Muslim life in Europe.


Mrs. Kat Callo is a Trustee of Project Mosaic, a pro-tolerance educational charity based in the UK. The charity was set up in 2008 in memory of Kat’s cousin, Dave Fontana, who was one of the 343 firefighters that died on September 11, 2001 while helping to rescue some 28,000 people from the World Trade Towers. Project Mosaic (www.projectmosaic.net) teaches children and young people to be more tolerant of those from a different background. The charity works on a grassroots level to promote interfaith and intercultural tolerance, inter-ethnic good citizenship and integration of immigrant communities, and to combat group hatred and extremism.

Project Mosaic sends successful people from immigrant backgrounds to give inspiring “Global Citizen” talks to young people in schools and youth clubs. Previously she worked at Reuters for 17 years, as a correspondent based in London, Brussels, Manila, Hong Kong and Hanoi. She reported on conflict in Afghanistan and Cambodia in the 1980s and traveled extensively as a journalist throughout Asia. Kat later worked as a media executive at Reuters London headquarters. She has lived in the UK for nearly 20 years.

Ms. Rita Payne: ‘Women and Success – Is Hard Work Enough?‘                                                                                     Chair of UK branch of Commonwealth Journalists Association (CJA), former Editor of BBC Asia, Freelance journalist and media adviser. The main mission of the CJA is to promote media freedom and the protection of journalists. I am regularly invited to write, address, moderate or organise debates and discussions on topical issues for the CJA and outside organisations. Until my retirement in 2008, I spent nearly thirty years with the BBC. My last position was Asia Editor, BBC World News (TV) with responsibility for three news programmes a day. Before moving to TV I was a news editor/producer/presenter at BBC World Service radio. I have been invited to moderate two sessions at the UN World Urban Forum in March, 2010. I was shortlisted for the BBC Global Reith Awards 2009.

Miss Anisha Pabari: (no photo) Currently a University student in London studying Bsc Business Administration and BA international relations. An Interfaith activist in Geneva with several projects hosted at the UN e.g. interfaith and disarmament, prevention mediation and peace building. She has an ongoing project in non-profit recycling industry in east India. She has a very international background. Her family is originally Indian but her family migrated from India to East Africa, then Egypt and Switzerland. She completed a charitable project in August 2008, fundraising for and then building a school in Tanzania.

Mrs. Hadia Saad: Activist in Muslim Women’s Issues for Alulbayt Foundation in London. Hadia Saad obtained her degree in Humanities from University of Greenwich in 1994. She was a press officer for the Embassy of Qatar from 1994 until 1996. She later received training to teach English to speakers of other languages and taught in various institutions in Lebanon from 1998 until 2006.

Please see the UPF Statement on the Status of Women for a ‘Parallel Event at the 54th Session of the Commission on the Status of Women’.

Kindly RVSP to reserve your place. There will be a £3 charge for refreshments and expenses. We look forward to meeting you.

Yours sincerely,

Cllr. Margaret Ali               Director  UPF       077 2302 4750          pa@uk.upf.org

Mrs Mitty Tohma               President WFWP  UK    07515947608  mitty@wfwp.org.uk

Robin Marsh                        Sec. Gen.  UPF     079 5621 0768            pa@uk.upf.org

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UPF Statement on the Status of Women

Posted by peacedevelopmentnetwork on March 3, 2010

Universal Peace Federation


UPF STATEMENT ON THE STATUS OF WOMEN


Universal Peace Federation’s Parallel Event at the 54th Session of the Commission on the Status of Women, taking place March 1 to 12, 2010 at the United Nations, highlights the essential value and central role of women in peacebuilding and human development.

UPF affirms the need for women to serve in leadership positions throughout the world in all sectors of society.

UPF recognizes the equal value of men and women. Their absolute value derives from a common origin, God. God is the origin of both men and women, and all of God’s creation manifests complementary masculine and feminine aspects.

Men and women are extensions and manifestations of God’s harmonious masculinity and femininity. The complementary relationship between men and women expresses the wholeness of human experience. Thus, there should be no gender discrimination but rather harmony of the sexes through love.

Throughout history, women have taken the leading role in cultivating families as the dwelling places of peace and love, in shaping the individual character of children, and in fostering harmonious social relationships. In the family, both father and mother are equally entitled to reverence and honor. The path toward establishing global peace begins with strengthening families.

The ideal of peace is at the core of all religions. Through dialogue and mutual understanding, there can be peace among religions, and peace among religions is a necessary prerequisite for world peace. Women can and should play a central role in promoting interfaith understanding and cooperation.

UPF emphasizes the essential importance of women in addressing issues of peace and development in all sectors, including politics, business, culture, and religion. Women must be encouraged and empowered to assume leadership roles in the resolution of conflict, peacebuilding, and sustainable development.

Universal Peace Federation

Office of UN and International Relations

866 UN Plaza, Suite 529

New York, NY 10017

Tel: 212-588-1802 Fax: 212-826-2176

Email: unoffice@upf.org

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